Treating Gout Attacks at Home

Gout is one of the most painful forms of arthritis. It occurs when too much uric acid builds up in the body. For many people, the first attack of gout happens in the big toe. These attacks can happen over and over again unless gout is treated. Over time, they can harm your joints, tendons, and other tissues.

It’s estimated that between one and two in every 100 people in the UK are affected by gout and it is more persistent in men than women.

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Signs and Symptoms of gout:

      • Pain in the joint

      • Swelling

      • Redness

      • Heat

      • Stiffness in joint

      • Limited movement in the affected joint.

A gout attack most often happens while the person is sleeping. The attacks can last a few days or many weeks before the pain goes away. Another attack may not happen for months or years.

Treatment for gout includes pain relief to help you cope with a gout attack , as well as medication and lifestyle changes to prevent further attacks.

How to Manage a Gout Attack?

If your joint is tender, swollen, red and radiating heat you must act fast.

Firstly you should take medicine you have on hand. You can use ibuprofen or naproxen, but never aspirin, because it can worsen an attack.

Ice down.

You need to apply an ice pack to the painful joint for 20 minutes to relief the pain and reduce the inflammation.

Call your doctor.

Always remember that you must consult your doctor and let him know what is going on with your condition.

Drink plenty of fluids.

In this way you will flush out uric acid and also prevent kidneys stones and other problems associated with high uric acid levels.

Avoid Alcohol.

In case of gout attack you must avoid alcohol especially beer, because it contains high levels of purines.

Elevate your foot, if affected. In this way you will reduce the swelling and relive the pain.


Stress can aggravate gout so you must chill out and have enough rest.

Revamp the menu. You should stop eating high-purine foods like red meat, sweetbreads and shellfish.